9 Wheelchair accessible beaches around Victoria, BC

Everyone should be able to enjoy the beautiful beaches that Victoria, BC has to offer. However, many of the beaches around the city are difficult to access for people with mobility limitations. Victoria’s beaches often have steep pathways (like Gonzales Beach), uneven ground, or stairway access points (like Willows Beach). Unfortunately, this lack of wheelchair-accessible beaches in Victoria, BC makes it difficult for some people to access and enjoy the beach.

Luckily, there are a handful of wheelchair-accessible beaches around Victoria and Vancouver Island. These beaches have accessible features and amenities, allowing you and your loved ones to have a wonderful day at the beach!

I’ve compiled a list of the most accessible beaches in Victoria, BC. I provide information on the accessibility of each beach and what to expect. Due to the limited number of accessible beaches in Victoria, I’ve included both beaches that are designed for wheelchair access and beaches that are semi-accessible.

Best wheelchair accessible beaches in Victoria, BC

The beach at Island View Beach Regional Park
The beach at Island View Beach Regional Park

In no particular order, here is a list of the best wheelchair-accessible beaches in Victoria, BC to help you plan an enjoyable day at the beach!

For each beach, I’ve tried to include as much information as possible about the accessibility of the beach. I note whether the beach has accessible washrooms, availability of accessible parking, what kind of walkways to expect, what the beach access is like, whether there are any other amenities at the beach and public transportation to the beach.

1. Cadboro-Gyro Park beach

The beautiful sandy beach at Cadboro-Gyro Park
The beautiful sandy beach at Cadboro-Gyro Park

Cadboro-Gyro Park is one of the most accessible beaches in Victoria, BC! This gorgeous park was redesigned recently with accessibility in mind, making it easier to access both the beach and park. The park has a ramp down to the sand and during the summer, there is a seasonally-available beach mobility mat to help you access the water.

Additionally, the Cadboro-Gyro Park playground has been designed with accessibility in mind, so your child won’t feel left out! This oceanfront playground has easily accessed play areas, wood chips, cool animal sculptures like an octopus and Cadborosaurus, interactive play structures, saucer swings, and a semi-accessible pirate ship.

The Cadborosaurus playground structure at Cadboro-Gyro Park
The Cadborosaurus playground structure at Cadboro-Gyro Park

Not only is the beach more accessible, but Cadboro-Gyro Park is also extremely beautiful! The large, crescent-shaped beach has soft sand and plenty of driftwood logs. From the beach, you’ll have scenic views of Cadboro Bay, with seals and seabirds floating in the water. In the distance, you’ll spot the Olympic Mountains over the Salish Sea. Also, the beach is a wonderful place to watch the sunrise!

Accessibility at Cadboro-Gyro Park

The accessible pirate ship at Cadboro-Gyro Park
The accessible pirate ship at Cadboro-Gyro Park

Cadboro-Gyro Park accessible parking and public transportation

Map: Google Maps location of Cadboro-Gyro Park

Accessible parking: There are 2 accessible parking stalls by the washroom. The parking lot is gravel but there is pavement by the accessible parking spaces. The parking lot is quite spacious, but the rest of the parking lot tends to get a lot of potholes, which fill with water in the winter.

Public transportation: The #11 bus stops on Cadboro Bay Road near Sinclair Road, about 350m from the beach. You will have to cross a 4-way intersection to get to the beach. There is a paved sidewalk, although you will have to cross the parking lot entrance, which has crushed gravel.

Cadboro-Gyro Park pathways and beach access

The accessible picnic tables at Cadboro-Gyro Park
The accessible picnic tables at Cadboro-Gyro Park

Pathways: The pathways through the park are mostly paved, although there is a bit of crushed gravel in a couple of spots. The pathways are all quite flat and have even surfaces.

Beach access: There is one paved ramp down to the sand, which does not have a railing. As well, there is a seasonally-available 30-m roll-out beach access mat. During winter, the mat is removed, although you can still use the ramp. Due to the tide, sometimes driftwood logs block the ramp, especially in the winter. Other access points are small sets of stairs (about 3 steps) without railings.

Accessible amenities at Cadboro-Gyro Park

The bathrooms at Cadboro-Gyro Park beach
The bathrooms at Cadboro-Gyro Park beach

Accessible washrooms: There are accessible washrooms with one accessible toilet stall for each bathroom. However, there are no gender-neutral washrooms. The bathrooms are open 7 am – 11 pm (closes at 8 pm in late October – April).

Picnic areas and benches: There are 11 accessible picnic tables located in the park. Other picnic tables in the park are surrounded by grass. There are many ocean-facing benches, as well as benches around the playground.

Accessible playground: One of the highlights at Cadboro-Gyro Park is their accessible playground, which has flat entrances or gently sloped ramps leading into sand or wood chip play areas. Additionally, there is a semi-accessible pirate ship. However, the ship’s wheel is located up 3 steps. There are also saucer swings and several interactive play structures located near the pathways.

2. Ross Bay Beach

Ross Bay Beach in Victoria in the evening during winter
Ross Bay Beach in Victoria in the evening during winter

Ross Bay Beach, located just south of Dallas Road and the Ross Bay Cemetery, is another beautiful, wheelchair-accessible beach in Victoria, BC. This rocky beach has recently been equipped with an accessible ramp and a summer mobility beach mat to improve beach and water access. There is a paved pathway that runs beside the ocean, so you can enjoy scenic views all along the waterfront!

At this beach, you’ll have spectacular views of the Juan de Fuca Strait and the mountains, as well as Clover Point. While the beach is rocky, it’s still great for sunbathing and watching the waves. Plus, if you follow Dallas Road west, you will find more beautiful, accessible parks: the incredibly scenic Clover Point Park and the Dallas Road Waterfront Trail. This ocean-front, accessible pathway leads all the way to the popular, accessible Ogden Point Breakwater!

Accessibility information for Ross Bay Beach

The accessible ramp at Ross Bay Beach in Victoria during winter
The accessible ramp at Ross Bay Beach in Victoria during winter

Accessible parking at Ross Bay Beach

Map: Google Maps location of Ross Bay Beach

Accessible parking: There are 2 accessible parking stalls on the east side of the parking lot on Dallas Road, near Memorial Crescent. The parking lot is fully paved. Alternatively, you can park at Clover Point, which has several accessible parking spaces.

Public transportation: The #3 bus stops along Bushby Street, at either Joseph Street (200m from the beach) or Eberts Street (110m from the beach). The #3 and #7 stop on Memorial Crescent, about 280m from the beach. There are paved sidewalks that lead from the bus stops to the beach, and a crosswalk across Dallas Road on Memorial Crescent.

Ross Bay Beach pathways and beach access

The paved walkway at Ross Bay Beach in winter
The paved walkway at Ross Bay Beach in winter

Pathways: The pathway along the beach is paved and mostly flat. At each end of the beach (near Clover Point or St. Charles Street), there is a slight incline. There is a crosswalk that crosses Dallas Road at Memorial Crescent.

Beach access: There is a paved, gently-sloped ramp leading to the beach with a railing on one side. Also, there is a seasonally-available beach mobility mat to help people with wheeled mobility devices access the beach. Tides may move driftwood logs to block the ramp, especially in winter.

There is also a ramp at the east end of the beach, but it is steep and not very accessible.

Accessible amenities at Ross Bay Beach

The accessible washrooms at Clover Point in Victoria, nearby Ross Bay Beach
The accessible washrooms at Clover Point in Victoria, nearby Ross Bay Beach

Accessible washrooms: There is a small, one-stall bathroom in the corner of the Ross Bay Cemetery at Dallas Road and Memorial Crescent, which is not accessible due to its size. Clover Point Park is a better choice if you need to use the washroom, as they have brand new, accessible bathrooms and are located nearby the beach (about 850m from the Ross Bay Beach parking lot).

Picnic areas and benches: There are many oceanfront benches along the pathway. As well, if you head to Clover Point, they have several accessible picnic tables with 6 wheelchair spots.

Other amenities: None at the beach, although there are many other accessible attractions in the area, including the Ross Bay Cemetery, Clover Point, Beacon Hill, and the Dallas Road waterfront trail.

3. Esquimalt Lagoon

Sandy beach at Esquimalt Lagoon
Sandy beach at Esquimalt Lagoon

Esquimalt Lagoon in Colwood is the perfect, accessible sandy beach to visit on a hot summer day. This long, beautiful beach runs along the Coburg peninsula, facing the Juan de Fuca Strait. The beach is lined with driftwood sculptures of animals and mythical creatures, which you can even view from your car! Across Ocean Boulevard, there are the calm waters of the lagoon, designated a migratory bird sanctuary.

Along the lagoon, there is a crushed gravel pathway that follows the water. There is also a semi-accessible beach area near the washrooms, which has a gently-sloped gravel/sand path leading to the beach. There are other pathways leading to the Colwood oceanfront, but the pathways sometimes get blocked by driftwood that is moved by the tide.

Hummingbird driftwood sculpture at Esquimalt Lagoon with mountains in the distance
Hummingbird driftwood sculpture at Esquimalt Lagoon with mountains in the distance

The city of Colwood is working on improving the accessibility of Esquimalt Lagoon, with plans to install a universal access mat to both the ocean and lagoon beaches. Hopefully, these features are installed soon!

Also, you’ll spot the majestic Hatley Castle across the lagoon, and the nearby Fisgard Lighthouse, looking over the ocean. Hatley Castle grounds, Fisgard Lighthouse, and the nearby Fort Rodd Hill are all wheelchair accessible, as well.

Accessibility information for Esquimalt Lagoon

Esquimalt Lagoon beach and forest
Esquimalt Lagoon beach and forest

Accessible parking at Esquimalt Lagoon

Map: Google Maps location of Esquimalt Lagoon

Accessible parking: There are accessible parking stalls located along the beach. There are two near the washrooms by Lagoon Road and Ocean Boulevard. The parking lots have crushed gravel.

Public transportation: The #52 bus route goes right to Esquimalt Lagoon, with the bus stop near the washrooms at Lagoon Road and Ocean Boulevard, only a few meters from the beach.

Pathways and beach access at Esquimalt Lagoon

Pathways: The pathway along the lagoon is gravel, and generally flat. It may be difficult to access for some people, as there are grassy spots. There are some pathways through the grass/shrub on the oceanside, but the accessibility of these paths varies due to vegetation, driftwood, and sand.

Ocean access: There are several beach access pathways along the Colwood waterfront. The best path is near the accessible washrooms by Lagoon Road. The pathway is gravel and sand, so it might be difficult for some people to access as the surface is not super firm. Driftwood sometimes blocks the pathways leading to the beach. Colwood has plans to install a mobility mat that will help with beach access in the summer.

Accessible amenities at Esquimalt Lagoon

Accessible washrooms: There are accessible washrooms on Ocean Boulevard, near Lagoon Road. There are also outhouses in the middle of Ocean Boulevard, but these are not accessible.

Picnic areas and benches: There are benches along Esquimalt Lagoon where you can enjoy the scenic views of the water. There is an accessible picnic table close to the second parking area, just northeast of the washrooms.

Nearby attractions: Hatley Castle grounds, Fisgard Lighthouse, and Fort Rodd Hill are all nearby and accessible.

4. Island View Beach Regional Park

The driftwood and rocks piled up on Island View Beach
The driftwood and rocks piled up on Island View Beach

Along the east side of the Saanich Peninsula, you’ll find Island View Beach Regional Park, which has a long, sand-and-pebble beach with a scenic pathway running beside it. The beachside pathway is mostly gravel, although some spots in the north get sandy and less accessible. As well, there is a boat ramp that would allow you to access the sandy beach from the south parking lot. However, the ramp is not in the best condition, so it might not be the perfect way to access the beach.

This beautiful beach has excellent views of James Island and the Cordova Channel. It’s a great spot for birdwatching or watching the sunrise. There is plenty to see at this beach, and you can even have a picnic at their sheltered picnic table area!

Compared to the other city beaches, Island View Beach is more difficult to access due to its location in a more rural area. There is no public transportation to the beach, and it’s about a 30-minute drive from downtown Victoria.

Accessibility of Island View Beach Regional Park

The sunset over Island View Beach Regional Park
The sunset over Island View Beach Regional Park

Island View Beach Regional Park accessible parking and public transportation

Map: Google Maps location of Island View Beach

Accessible parking: There are 6 accessible parking stalls, mostly in the central parking area.

Public transportation: None.

Island View Beach Regional Park pathways and beach access

Pathways: The pathways at Island View Beach are flat, with a level, crushed gravel surface. Further north, parts of the pathway are not accessible for wheeled mobility devices because the path gets sandy. The pathway is 900-m, one-way.

Beach access: There is a boat ramp that leads onto the beach near the southern parking lot. However, the ramp is not in the best condition, and the end of the ramp is sandy/rocky. The beach is a mix of rocks and sand. Sometimes, driftwood can block the ramp, especially in the winter.

Accessible amenities at Island View Beach Regional Park

Accessible washrooms: There is an accessible washroom near the start of the trail, close to Island View Road. There is a second washroom down the trail, but it is less accessible.

Picnic areas and benches: There is a sheltered picnic table area and a couple of unsheltered picnic tables. However, there are not many benches around the park. One bench is located on the oceanfront pathway near the intersection that leads to the northern washroom.

Other amenities: There is a seasonally-available campground.

5. Thetis Lake Regional Park

The main beach at Thetis Lake in Victoria, BC during autumn
The main beach at Thetis Lake in Victoria, BC during autumn

Despite being a lake, Thetis Lake Regional Park still has one of the most beautiful, wheelchair-accessible sandy beaches in Victoria, BC. While most of Thetis Lake is rocky around the edges, the main beach at Thetis Lake Regional Park near the first parking lot is sandy, with paths that take you right up to the beach!

You can access the main beach at Thetis Lake from the first parking lot, or use the accessible parking stalls that are conveniently located right beside the beach. There is a gentle slope down from the parking stalls to the beach, but the paths down to the beach are good.

There is also a second, smaller sandy west beach near the furthest parking lot. This beach is mostly used by dog owners and for launching boats. There are also a couple of accessible parking stalls at this beach.

Unfortunately, most of the pathways around Thetis Lake Regional Park are not accessible, as they are uneven and rocky. However, you can easily access part of the edge of the lake on the east side of the beach. Also, there is a paved dock/viewing platform that juts into the lake where you can enjoy the scenic views!

Accessibility information for Thetis Lake Regional Park

Thetis Lake Regional Park accessible parking and public transportation

Map: Google Maps location of Thetis Lake Regional Park’s main beach

Accessible parking: There are accessible parking stalls at the Main Beach and West Beach at Thetis Lake.

Public transportation: The #53 bus goes to the main parking lot at Thetis Lake, which is about 180m from the beach on paved pathways.

Thetis Lake Regional Park pathways and beach access

Pathways: The pathways leading to the beaches are accessible, mostly flat and a mix of crushed gravel and pavement. However, most of the other pathways around Thetis Lake are not accessible due to uneven surfaces and hills.

Beach access: The main beach is very accessible, with flat paths that lead up to the beach and close to the water. The beach is flat and the sand is compacted. The west beach is also accessible but used more by dog owners and for launching non-motorized watercraft.

Accessible amenities at Thetis Lake Regional Park

Accessible washrooms: There are accessible washrooms and change rooms at the Main Beach. West Beach has a small outhouse, which is not accessible.

Picnic areas and benches: There are multiple, accessible picnic tables at Main Beach. Most picnic tables are surrounded by grass, although the grass is usually quite compact and easy to maneuver on. West Beach has one picnic table on the beach.

Other amenities: The dock/viewing platform is paved and a great place for a scenic view of the lake. Additionally, there is a water fountain at the main beach.

6. Whiffin Spit

Whiffin Spit is a kilometer-long naturally formed spit in Sooke, with a beautiful coastal trail and a rocky beach. The spit stretches into the Sooke Harbour, giving you amazing views of the ocean and the rugged coastline of East Sooke. Here, you’ll have the chance to see river otters, sea lions, great blue herons, seals, and all kinds of sea birds. Also, with gorgeous panoramic views of the ocean, you’ll get to see amazing sunsets from this beach!

The trail on Whiffin Spit is very level, with crushed gravel for most of the trail. The Whiffin Spit Trail is about 2.7km total. While access to the beach varies along the trail due to driftwood and rocks, there is a spot at the end of the trail where the beach is more accessible for wheelchairs and other wheeled mobility devices. There, you can enjoy great views of the water while soaking up the sun!

Accessibility information for Whiffin Spit

Whiffin Spit accessible parking and public transportation

Map: Google Maps location of Whiffin Spit.

Accessible parking: There are two accessible parking stalls in the paved Whiffin Spit parking lot.

Public transportation: The #63 bus stops nearby Whiffin Spit. If you’re coming from Victoria, you’ll need to take the #61 bus then transfer to the #63.

The bus stop by Whiffin Spit is near the intersection of Whiffin Spit Road and Dufour Road, about 200m from the Whiffin Spit trailhead. There isn’t a sidewalk on Dufour Road so you would have to use the road for a few meters before you get to Whiffin Spit Road’s sidewalk. However, closer to Whiffin Spit, the sidewalk disappears again and you’ll need to use the paved road.

Pathways and beach access at Whiffin Spit

Pathways: The pathway is made of smooth gravel, although sometimes storms wash larger rocks or driftwood onto the path. The city regularly clears the trail of large debris, though. The trail is very flat, wide, and has amazing ocean views the entire way.

Beach access: Whiffin Spit has a rockier beach. Most of the trail doesn’t have great access points to the beach, due to rocks, driftwood, and grass. Accessibility also varies depending on how the ocean moves the rocks and driftwood. However, at the very end of Whiffin Spit, there is a path to the right that you can use to access part of the beach. The path is very flat, with a fairly compact/firm gravel surface until you get further onto the beach, where it gets rockier with a less firm surface.

Accessible amenities at Whiffin Spit

Accessible washrooms: There are no accessible washrooms. There is an outhouse on the trail.

Picnic areas and benches: Along the trail, there are a lot of benches, all facing the ocean. Some benches are more accessible than others. Some are right on the trail, while others are down short paths, sometimes blocked by driftwood or rocks. There are no picnic tables.

Other amenities: There is a drinking water fountain at the start of the Whiffin Spit trail. The fountain also has a water bottle fill-up and dog bowl.

7. Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park

Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park is a large park in Saanich that consists of sandy beaches, forest trails, and grassy areas around two beautiful connected lakes, Elk Lake (north) and Beaver Lake (south). This park is very scenic. You can have a picnic under the huge willow trees while enjoying the calm water of the lake. The park is great for family outings!

There are three beaches at Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park, each with a parking lot. The most accessible beach, Hamsterly Beach, is on the north side of the park on the edge of Elk Lake. Eagle Lake is by the Victoria City Rowing Club, in the middle of the park. Lastly, Beaver Beach is on the south side of the park, on the edge of Beaver Lake. There is a semi-accessible, 10km path that goes all the way around the lake, connecting the beaches.

Accessibility information for Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park

Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park accessible parking and public transportation

Map: Google Maps location of Hamsterly Beach in Elk-Beaver Lake Regional Park

Hamsterly Beach has 5 accessible parking stalls, with a paved parking lot and pathways. The closest bus stop is on the southbound side of Highway 17 by the gas station, about 450m away from the parking lot. Bus #70, 71, 72, and 75 stop at this bus stop.

Eagle Beach has 2 accessible parking stalls, with a paved parking lot but some gravel on the road and pathways. There are no bus stops near Eagle Beach.

Beaver Beach has 7 accessible parking stalls, with a paved parking lot and nearby paths. There are two bus stops by the Elk Lake Drive and Beaver Lake Road intersection. The #35, 72, and 75 bus route goes to these bus stops.

Pathways and beach access at Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park

Pathways: The pathways around the park are a mix of paved sidewalks, smooth gravel, or forest trails. Some parts of the trail have roots or gradually sloping ground, although generally, the trail is flat. There are some narrow or uneven parts on the trail.

Beach access: The beaches are quite flat, and the pathways lead quite close to the beach. The beaches are accessed by crossing a small patch of grass, however. Hamsterly Beach is the most accessible because there isn’t a wood edge around the beach (unlike Beaver Beach).

Accessible amenities at Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park

Accessible washrooms: There are accessible toilets at Beaver Beach and Hamsterly Beach. These washrooms are closed from November to April but open through the summer months.

Picnic areas and benches: There are several benches located around the park, mostly by the beaches. There are uncovered picnic tables at all of the beaches, as well as a few other locations around the lake. There is a covered picnic shelter at Eagle Beach. The picnic tables are usually surrounded by grass.

Other amenities: There is a drinking fountain at Hamsterly Beach.

The Brookleigh Boat Launch is accessible and has an accessible toilet. There is also the Elk Lake Float, which is an accessible ramp and fishing float on Elk Lake. Hamsterly Beach also has a small playground, with an accessible ramp that leads to the middle of the playground structure. Most of the playground is not accessible, though.

8. Finnerty Cove

Finnerty Cove is a wheelchair-accessible beach in Victoria, BC that is truly a hidden gem. This beautiful beach can be found just north of the Queen Alexandra Centre for Children’s Health. Because it is hidden away behind the centre, the beach is often quite quiet and secluded.

There is a long paved ramp that leads down to the water, with a very gradual slope. The beach has amazing views of the Haro Strait, and it is surrounded by the rocky shore and beautiful trees.

Accessibility at Finnerty Cove

Finnerty Cove accessible parking and public transportation

Map: Google Maps location of Finnerty Cove

Accessible parking: There are accessible parking stalls at the Queen Alexandra Centre nearby. Here is a map of accessible parking at Queen Alexandra. Parking at the centre costs $1.25 per hour, paid by coins or credit card. The parking lot is paved.

Public transportation: The #11 bus route stops on Arbutus Road, at the entrance to the Queen Alexandra Centre. It is about 500m from the beach, all on paved pathways.

Pathways and beach access at Finnerty Cove

Pathways: All of the pathways near the Queen Alexandra Centre are paved and accessible. The beach pathway off Haro Road is gravel and less accessible.

Beach access: From the Queen Alexandra Centre, there is a paved ramp that goes all the way down to the beach. The ramp is quite long and has a gradual slope, so it is quite accessible. There is also a set of stairs that heads down to the beach.

Accessible amenities at Finnerty Cove

Accessible washrooms: There are no bathrooms at the beach.

Picnic tables and benches: There are no benches or picnic tables at the beach.

Other amenities: There is a sheltered gazebo near Haro Road that overlooks the cove.

9. Old Mill Park at Shawnigan Lake

Shawnigan Lake is a beautiful, family-friendly lake located in the Cowichan Valley, just north of Victoria. Old Mill Park has a wheelchair-accessible beach, complete with a mobility mat to improve access to the water. Here, you can sit on the beach and enjoy the sun while you look out at the calm water of the lake and the beautiful forest that surrounds it.

Old Mill Park’s beach takes about 45 minutes of driving from downtown Victoria by car. However, a day at the Old Mill Park beach is definitely worth the drive!

Accessibility at Shawnigan lake

Shawnigan Lake accessible parking and public transportation

Map: Google Maps location of Old Mill Park

Accessible parking: There is a small parking lot at Old Mill Park. However, there are no officially designated accessible parking spaces. The parking lot is crushed gravel.

Public transportation: The #99 bus route connects Victoria with Shawnigan Lake, but does not stop at Old Mill Park. The closest bus stop to Old Mill Park on the #99 route is on Shawnigan Lake-Mill Bay Road, about 1.7 km away from Old Mill Park.

Pathways and beach access at Shawnigan Lake

Pathways: Generally, the pathways around Old Mill Park have even surfaces with some gradual sloping. The pathways lead right down to the beach.

Beach access: The beach is accessed by a gravel pathway that leads down to the water, with a beach mobility mat.

Accessible amenities at Shawnigan Lake

Accessible washrooms: There are seasonally available toilet facilities at old Mill Park.

Picnic tables and benches: There are several picnic tables beside the lake.

Other amenities: There is a small playground although it doesn’t have accessible features. There is a nearby public boat launch on Barton Place. There are also other parks located around Shawnigan Lake, although old Mill Park is the most accessible.

Accessible hotels in Victoria, BC

After a long day at one of the wheelchair-accessible beaches in Victoria, BC, you need a good hotel to relax at and enjoy your evening. However, not every hotel in Victoria has been designed with accessibility in mind. I’ve selected the top three accessible hotels in the Greater Victoria area, to help you find an accessible place to stay. These hotels all provide comfortable rooms on the waterfront, with everything that you could need to enjoy your stay in Victoria!

Most famous: The Fairmont Empress

The Empress Hotel overlooking the Inner Harbour in Victoria, BC
The Empress Hotel overlooking the Inner Harbour in Victoria, BC

The most famous hotel in Victoria is the Fairmont Empress, and luckily, it is also quite accessible! This hotel has an incredible location right on the Inner Harbour, so it’s very convenient if you want to explore Victoria’s downtown and harbor area. The staff at this hotel are incredibly welcoming and helpful. The hotel is a historic site and many famous people have stayed at the Empress!

The hotel is generally quite accessible, with elevators and ramps for wheelchair access. There are four wheelchair-accessible rooms with king beds and a roll-in shower. The hotel also has a wheelchair and shower bench that you can borrow. However, one of the downsides of staying at this hotel is that it can be quite a bit to navigate, with accessible rooms located far from the lobby and some doors that are difficult to use with a wheelchair.

Most accessible: Hotel Grand Pacific

Hotel Grand Pacific is one of the most accessible hotels in Victoria, and it’s a great place for you to stay on your visit to Victoria! This hotel is located conveniently near Victoria’s Inner Harbour, with amazing views of the water.

This hotel is very accessible, with ramps, elevators, and 7 wheelchair-accessible rooms. The bathrooms are spacious, with roll-in showers that have a bench, grab bar, and adjustable showerhead. The rooms also have automated doors, a lowered queen bed, and even an accessible balcony! They’ve also made sure to lower other room features, like shelves and light switches.

Near the ferry: The Sidney Pier Hotel & Spa

The Sidney Pier Hotel & Spa is a great choice if you prefer to stay in the charming seaside town of Sidney. This hotel has a beautiful location right on the Sidney waterfront, conveniently nearby the Swartz Bay Ferry. The hotel is very wheelchair accessible, with an accessible entrance, lobby, restaurant, and spa.

They have two wheelchair king-bed rooms with large bathrooms that have a wide roll-in shower with a bench. The bathroom sink is open underneath but has limited counter space. The rooms have electrical plugins that are close to the ground, which may be difficult to reach. There are elevators to help you access the rooms and parkade, as well as accessible parking in their underground parkade. However, the accessible parking stalls are not close to the elevator. The hotel also has many flat, paved accessible pathways right outside of it, along the waterfront.

Accessibility resources for Victoria, BC

In addition to the wheelchair-accessible beaches around Victoria that I’ve listed, here are a few other resources that will help you find accessible spaces throughout Greater Victoria and BC.

Access Now is a website and app that helps you find accessible locations throughout Victoria, and worldwide. The website ranks places by accessibility. Also, it allows you to search for all kinds of accessible features. The website allows you to filter the map by accessible parking, washrooms, service animal-friendly locations, braille, sign language, scent-free places, gender-neutral washrooms, and more!

Another great way to find wheelchair-accessible places in Victoria, BC is to check out Wheel Map. This free map shows wheelchair-accessible places throughout the world. It can be updated by anyone. It ranks places based on wheelchair accessibility and provides access details!

The Victoria Disability Resource Centre is a non-profit organization that offers programs, workshops, and services to people with disabilities. They also have a great index of community resources and articles that you can access!

If you are trying to find the accessibility of parks around BC, there is a BC Park’s accessibility information page. This website provides access information and pictures of all parks and campgrounds managed by BC Parks. Also, for information on user-friendly trails in CRD Regional Parks around Victoria, check out the User-Friendly Trails Guide.

Final thoughts

Victoria, BC, is a beautiful city with many beaches, but wheelchair-accessible beaches around Victoria are sometimes difficult to find. Hopefully, this article helps you find the perfect accessible spot in Victoria for a beach day on a hot summer day!

There are many other accessible beaches around Vancouver Island or on the Gulf Islands, like Galiano Island (here’s how to get to Galiano from Victoria). There are also lots of other accessible activities in Victoria and on the rest of the island.

Here are some other things that you can do on your visit to Victoria: